Scientology

Ah, yes. Scientology.

Scientology is NOT a religion in the UK – no matter how hard it tries to hide behind the status of one. It was founded in the 1950s by US science-fiction writer L.Ron Hubbard – an individual who had a history of mental health problems and was on medication. L.Ron Hubbard (and his methods) have since been thoroughly discredited in most civilised countries.

‘Spiritual’ development in Scientology requires a member to spend large sums of money on ‘training courses’.

No other ‘religion’ has attracted as much negative publicity as Scientology.

Wikipedia has this to say about Scientology:

“Scientology has been surrounded by controversies since its inception. It has often been described as a cult that financially defrauds and abuses its members, charging exorbitant fees for its spiritual services.[6][15][16]

The Church of Scientology has consistently used litigation against such critics, and its aggressiveness in pursuing its foes has been condemned as harassment.[17][18] Further controversy has focused on Scientology’s belief that souls (“thetans”) reincarnate and have lived on other planets before living on Earth”

What do scientologists believe? They believe that they have ‘an absolute monopoly on effective solutions for the worlds’ problems’. Scientologists believe that they alone have the means and the responsibility to ‘clear’ the world of its problems.

The core Scientology story, written by L.Ron Hubbard is a trashy science fiction story that has become so embarrassing to Scientologists that they cannot even bring themselves to acknowledge or discuss it when asked about it. They either try to laugh it off as ‘unrecognisable’ or they storm out of interviews, saying that being asked to talk about the core beliefs of their ‘religion’ is unacceptably offensive.

Have a quick read of this, this and this.

Scientology has a number of ‘front’ organisations whose work is based on the teachings of Scientology founder L.Ron Hubbard or L.Ron Hubbard (depending whether you’re a critic of Scientology or a Scientology fan).

These include:

• Narconon

• Criminon

• Applied Scholastics

• The Way To Happiness Foundation

• Association for Better Living and Education

• The World Institute of Scientology Enterprises

• Citizens Commission on Human Rights

• Youth For Human Rights International

• Volunteer Ministers

It is clear from this list that these organisations give scientology access to particularly vulnerable individuals such as drug and alcohol addicts, criminals with mental health issues, young people and children.

Scientologists use a device called an ‘e-meter’ in a process of ‘auditing‘ – the removal of ‘engrams’, (images stored by the reactive mind) with the aim of reaching a state called ‘clear‘.  According to Wikipedia, ‘Scientology’s utopian aim is to “clear the planet”, [and create] a world in which everyone has cleared themselves of their engrams.[115]

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